Part 2

So we’re back again explaining part 2 of Making wooden windows and Casements. In this case just the casement. So where were we…

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

Window profile

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

So after two rebates with a hinge groove and a small capillary groove, we have our profile. All done on a table saw. Keeping the same face side and face edge to the fence or bed on each cut. Purposely I have put the face side and edge on the wrong side of the job. Even if I hadn’t with two rebates this would have happened…

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

I have cut my face edge of the piece of timber! At this point even though I started with the wrong rebate on purpose. To prove the point it does not matter. As long as you had the mark to make sure you always put them through the same way. Even though I would have lost some points if I was doing my city and guilds again. For the next stage, you definitely need to reinstate a face side and edge. Normally after achieving a profile, I would sand them off or what’s left of it off, because there usually rebate fodder at some stage. So not to confuse yourself I would sand remains of a mark off and re-do them and in this case, on the next stage, I put them in the wrong place again.

Double Tennon

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

The old double tennon think that’s what its called. You will see this joint a lot in wooden casments. In this example it basiclly in the middle of the profile but not quite. The two outside shoulders are the same distance so I mark them with the same gauge.

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

Mortice Gauge

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

Even though you could have adjusted the other gauge. I use the mortice gauge with two pins in conjunction with the other gauge. Usually, we would be making a few casements at once so we would leave these set up for the whole job. This was just a remake from a window that got blew away in a storm and I had some of the remaining profile to copy. Now here this gauge is not exactly in the centre of the profile. About half an mm or sorts. Enough though to upset stuff but not if you mark it all off the face side or edge. The same side for all joints. As you can see above I have the mark there but in the wrong place on the piece. However, all marking is done off the same side and it won’t make a difference. Do it on the wrong side of one style and its half an mm that way and half an mm the other way and then your joints a full mm out.

Cut to waste side of the line

So I marked and cut this little job by hand for the sake of the blog . Regreting that decision almost imediatly like the decesion to write a blog every week , You plod on. Point is to set the machines up just for four joints would probably come close time wise to me just quickly cutting them by hand. Or the time it took me to write this blog all fairly comparitable. Anyways when cutting joints by hand I cut kind of outside the line. The waste side so the piece your left with is slightly bigger then it should be.

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

Cleaning up excess

Making Wooden Windows and Casements
Making Wooden Windows and Casements
Making Wooden Windows and Casements

So after cutting your shoulders off, cleaning out your waste with the coping saw. You might pear off any bits with a sharp chisel. I’m using this quarter inch because that is the size of the finger,s going in. If I had used the machines there would be no Marking out or cleaning up joints. However, I would of still be using my face edge mark to put them through the machine the right way. Repeat this on your other joints but leaving shoulders on and reversing the waste of our initial lines.

Glueing Up

Making Wooden Windows and Casements
Making Wooden Windows and Casements

So check all the joints go together nicely, and put it together dry. Now I would measure the piece corner to corner, then opposite corners. To make sure it’s square if not. Something is too long or too short. Better something’s too long because you can trim it to size but if it’s too short, start again!

This is why we cut to the other side of the line better that mortice joint too big then it’s too small and if it is, that’s not a mortice joint its firewood. Probably not too many people cutting mortice joints by hand these days probably comparable to the number of people reading this blog. In other words “Better to be looking at it then for it!” This applies to a lot of things in life

  • Timber
  • Money
  • Credit
  • Love
  • Food
  • Friends
  • Work
  • etc

Always better to be looking at it then for it. Don’t cut stuff short always too long. Anyway, get your frame square and smather it in wood glue and clamp it up for the night. Cut off your excess Tennon’s and sand the frame and get it down the glass shop.

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

Alway’s bring your own coffe

If your waiting for the glass to be made and you’re into proper coffee. Got to bring your own or they’re gonna serve you some instant rubbish. Gonna wreck your day and probably your insides. A bit like if your hardcore extreme militant vegan and you’re going to a wedding, probably best you bring your own food.

Fitted Window

Making Wooden Windows and Casements

I toe and heeled the glass. Which means you pack the glass at the bottom corner at the hinge side and on the opposite top corner. To prevent the weight of the glass making the casement drop. Like a brace on a door or gate always going from the bottom hinge upwards to support itself. Screw on the hinges job done, and like me for another week job done. Until then Thanks Mart